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Using the ZWave.Me 5460 Wall Controller with VERA

This guide shows how to add the ZWave.Me 5460 Wall Controller into VERA. This wall controller is very versatile, as it can be used in different setups throughout your Z-Wave network. When included into you network, it can operate in different modes:

  • association mode; direct control of associated devices (On/Off/Dim)
  • scene mode; control of scenes in your controller.

Inclusion

Inclusion of the wall controller is straight-forward and is done with holding the include button for 2s when the Vera is in inclusion mode.

ZWave.Me 5460
ZWave.Me 5460

Parameter Configuration

Before you can use the controller as a scene controller, you need to set parameter 13 and 14 to value 3 (1 dec). You can do this by adding configuration parameters to the wall controller:

Parameter Settings

After setting these values, you need to “wake-up” the controller to finish the configuration. You can do this by doing a triple click on the paddle. Note: before you can actually see the new values, you have to perform a “reload” (top-right in Vera advanced interface).

Select scenes to control

Now its time to select two (or more), scenes to control. Go to this scene, and select the Tab “triggers”. Here you need to define which action to respond to. See also the following image, where will “catch” all scene Id’s and handle it in Luup code:

A Catch All for scene id's
A Catch All for scene id’s

And the Luup code I used to control scenes 11 and 12:

luup.call_delay(‘scene_controller’, 1)
function scene_controller()
local lastSceneID= luup.variable_get(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:SceneController1”, “LastSceneID”,130)
if (lastSceneID== “1”) the
luup.call_action(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:HomeAutomationGateway1″,”RunScene”,
{ SceneNum=”12″ },0)
elseif (lastSceneID== “2”) then
luup.call_action(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:HomeAutomationGateway1″,”RunScene”,
{ SceneNum=”11″ },0)
end
end

As you can see my controller (Zwave.Me 5460 module) is 130 and I only used the Up and Down scene command from the wall controller. The trick here is to look for the variable “lastSceneId”, which will change after a single or double click on the paddle.

Reference List of SceneID’s

  • Scene 1: Single Click on Upper Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 2: Single Click on Lower Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 3: Single Click Dim Up;
  • Scene 4: Single Click Dim Down;
  • Scene 5: Single Click Dim Up Stop
  • Scene 6: Single Click Dim Down Stop
  • Scene 11: Double Click on Upper Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 12: Double Click on Lower Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 13: Double Click Dim Up;
  • Scene 14: Double Click Dim Down;
  • Scene 15: Double Click Dim Up Stop
  • Scene 16: Double Click Dim Down Stop

Using the ZWave.Me 5460 Wall Controller with VERA

This guide shows how to add the ZWave.Me 5460 Wall Controller into VERA. This wall controller is very versatile, as it can be used in different setups throughout your Z-Wave network. When included into you network, it can operate in different modes:

  • association mode; direct control of associated devices (On/Off/Dim)
  • scene mode; control of scenes in your controller.

Inclusion

Inclusion of the wall controller is straight-forward and is done with holding the include button for 2s when the Vera is in inclusion mode.

ZWave.Me 5460
ZWave.Me 5460

Parameter Configuration

Before you can use the controller as a scene controller, you need to set parameter 13 and 14 to value 3 (1 dec). You can do this by adding configuration parameters to the wall controller:

Parameter Settings

After setting these values, you need to “wake-up” the controller to finish the configuration. You can do this by doing a triple click on the paddle. Note: before you can actually see the new values, you have to perform a “reload” (top-right in Vera advanced interface).

Select scenes to control

Now its time to select two (or more), scenes to control. Go to this scene, and select the Tab “triggers”. Here you need to define which action to respond to. See also the following image, where will “catch” all scene Id’s and handle it in Luup code:

A Catch All for scene id's
A Catch All for scene id’s

And the Luup code I used to control scenes 11 and 12:

luup.call_delay(‘scene_controller’, 1)
function scene_controller()
local lastSceneID= luup.variable_get(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:SceneController1”, “LastSceneID”,130)
if (lastSceneID== “1”) the
luup.call_action(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:HomeAutomationGateway1″,”RunScene”,
{ SceneNum=”12″ },0)
elseif (lastSceneID== “2”) then
luup.call_action(“urn:micasaverde-com:serviceId:HomeAutomationGateway1″,”RunScene”,
{ SceneNum=”11″ },0)
end
end

As you can see my controller (Zwave.Me 5460 module) is 130 and I only used the Up and Down scene command from the wall controller. The trick here is to look for the variable “lastSceneId”, which will change after a single or double click on the paddle.

Reference List of SceneID’s

  • Scene 1: Single Click on Upper Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 2: Single Click on Lower Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 3: Single Click Dim Up;
  • Scene 4: Single Click Dim Down;
  • Scene 5: Single Click Dim Up Stop
  • Scene 6: Single Click Dim Down Stop
  • Scene 11: Double Click on Upper Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 12: Double Click on Lower Part of Paddle;
  • Scene 13: Double Click Dim Up;
  • Scene 14: Double Click Dim Down;
  • Scene 15: Double Click Dim Up Stop
  • Scene 16: Double Click Dim Down Stop

Light level (LUX) timer based switch

Fibaro Motion Sensor

Recently the new Fibaro Motion Sensor was introduced. This device has the capability of measuring the light level (LUX) within the range from 0 ~ 32757 LUX. This is also the first device which can measure such levels and we would like to use it for putting our screens down when the light level exceeds 10000 LUX for 5 minutes or longer.

When the level drops below 10000 LUX (also for 5 minutes or longer), the screens must go up again. Please find yourself a suitable limit for going up/down.

Brightness Measuring

For this setup to work correctly you need at least UI6, as this is (for now) the only firmware which supports most of the options from the  motion sensor.

There is just one small problem when you want to trigger for a certain brightness level, as the conditions (< and >) don’t work correctly (yet) within this firmware. Please upload the following file to fix this problem:

D_LightSensor1.json
D_LightSensor1.json
D_LightSensor1.json
3.0 KiB
746 Downloads
Details

Please go to “Apps” -> “Develop Apps” and select the option “Luup files”. You may upload the file here. Don’t forget to check the box to restart Luup after reload.

Plugin Countdown Timer

For the timer based option – i.e. wait 5 minutes before executing a scene – we will use the plugin “Countdown Timer” (2 instances per motion sensor). As this is a plugin it can be downloaded directly by going to “Apps” -> “Install Apps”.

When done, there will be already 1 instance created. For our purposes we need 2 instances, so create another one:

Countdown Timer
Countdown Timer

When done, you will have two instances of the countdown timer in your dashboard. We are going to use each one for performing actions when a timer is completed :

Two Instances
Two Instances

Don’t forget to configure the duration – in our case 300 seconds, but you can use every value you prefer.

Set duration of the timer
Set duration of the timer

Creating the scenes

We will need 4 scene’s for executing all actions:

4 Scene's
4 Scene’s

Now it’s easy to get the timers going; the scene’s Lux > 10000 and Lux < 10000 will trigger the timers, depending on the Lux value measured by the motion sensor.

This can be done easily using a trigger in both scene’s and use this trigger to activate or stop the corresponding countdown timer:

"LUX

Brightness Trigger
Brightness Trigger

and in case LUX < 10000:

LUX < 10000
LUX < 10000
Brightness Trigger
Brightness Trigger

When done, you can do this also for the scene’s “Screens Up / Down” :

Screens UP
Screens UP
Screens DOWN
Screens DOWN

When you have configured everything properly, you can activate the timers manually by holding your hand on the “eye”. The LUX level will drop and the timer (LUX < 10000) will be activated. After the pre-configured time period, an event will occur (Screens UP).

If in any event – the LUX level will rise again above 10000, the other timer will be activated and the current timer will be canceled. When this timer ends, the scene Screens DOWN will occur.

Thats all! Suggestions are very welcome!

Light level (LUX) timer based switch

Fibaro Motion Sensor

Recently the new Fibaro Motion Sensor was introduced. This device has the capability of measuring the light level (LUX) within the range from 0 ~ 32757 LUX. This is also the first device which can measure such levels and we would like to use it for putting our screens down when the light level exceeds 10000 LUX for 5 minutes or longer.

When the level drops below 10000 LUX (also for 5 minutes or longer), the screens must go up again. Please find yourself a suitable limit for going up/down.

Brightness Measuring

For this setup to work correctly you need at least UI6, as this is (for now) the only firmware which supports most of the options from the  motion sensor.

There is just one small problem when you want to trigger for a certain brightness level, as the conditions (< and >) don’t work correctly (yet) within this firmware. Please upload the following file to fix this problem:

D_LightSensor1.json
D_LightSensor1.json
D_LightSensor1.json
3.0 KiB
746 Downloads
Details

Please go to “Apps” -> “Develop Apps” and select the option “Luup files”. You may upload the file here. Don’t forget to check the box to restart Luup after reload.

Plugin Countdown Timer

For the timer based option – i.e. wait 5 minutes before executing a scene – we will use the plugin “Countdown Timer” (2 instances per motion sensor). As this is a plugin it can be downloaded directly by going to “Apps” -> “Install Apps”.

When done, there will be already 1 instance created. For our purposes we need 2 instances, so create another one:

Countdown Timer
Countdown Timer

When done, you will have two instances of the countdown timer in your dashboard. We are going to use each one for performing actions when a timer is completed :

Two Instances
Two Instances

Don’t forget to configure the duration – in our case 300 seconds, but you can use every value you prefer.

Set duration of the timer
Set duration of the timer

Creating the scenes

We will need 4 scene’s for executing all actions:

4 Scene's
4 Scene’s

Now it’s easy to get the timers going; the scene’s Lux > 10000 and Lux < 10000 will trigger the timers, depending on the Lux value measured by the motion sensor.

This can be done easily using a trigger in both scene’s and use this trigger to activate or stop the corresponding countdown timer:

"LUX

Brightness Trigger
Brightness Trigger

and in case LUX < 10000:

LUX < 10000
LUX < 10000
Brightness Trigger
Brightness Trigger

When done, you can do this also for the scene’s “Screens Up / Down” :

Screens UP
Screens UP
Screens DOWN
Screens DOWN

When you have configured everything properly, you can activate the timers manually by holding your hand on the “eye”. The LUX level will drop and the timer (LUX < 10000) will be activated. After the pre-configured time period, an event will occur (Screens UP).

If in any event – the LUX level will rise again above 10000, the other timer will be activated and the current timer will be canceled. When this timer ends, the scene Screens DOWN will occur.

Thats all! Suggestions are very welcome!

Adding a daytime variable to Fibaro HC

When you are programming your scenes within Fibaro HC 2 or Lite, you may probably wanted to know what part of day it is (i.e. to turn on a light when no light detector is available).

Within Fibaro it is quite easy to define variables. These can be used throughout the scenes and makes it possible to react on certain times or situations.

Adding a predefined variable

Adding a predefined variable is pretty straight forward and can be done in the panels section.

Add a predefined variable
Add a predefined variable

When done, save and close the panel. Don’t forget to initially set the variable to the correct part of day.

Create scenes

To actually change the variable, we need to create scenes. In our case we have defined two possible situations, i.e. ‘after sunrise‘ and ‘after sunset’.

Make sure to check the box “Start when Home Center 2/Lite starts”. After creating the scenes, the variable will be updated corresponding the part of day.

An working example

In our situation we created a real live situation, which works pretty well in our case.

As we don’t have a light detection at a certain section within the house, or if we don’t want to do direct association, we turn on the light when our variable holds the value “After sunset” and a trigger is breached:

Turn on a light when daypart is "After sunset"
Turn on a light when daypart is “After sunset”

 

Adding a daytime variable to Fibaro HC

When you are programming your scenes within Fibaro HC 2 or Lite, you may probably wanted to know what part of day it is (i.e. to turn on a light when no light detector is available).

Within Fibaro it is quite easy to define variables. These can be used throughout the scenes and makes it possible to react on certain times or situations.

Adding a predefined variable

Adding a predefined variable is pretty straight forward and can be done in the panels section.

Add a predefined variable
Add a predefined variable

When done, save and close the panel. Don’t forget to initially set the variable to the correct part of day.

Create scenes

To actually change the variable, we need to create scenes. In our case we have defined two possible situations, i.e. ‘after sunrise‘ and ‘after sunset’.

Make sure to check the box “Start when Home Center 2/Lite starts”. After creating the scenes, the variable will be updated corresponding the part of day.

An working example

In our situation we created a real live situation, which works pretty well in our case.

As we don’t have a light detection at a certain section within the house, or if we don’t want to do direct association, we turn on the light when our variable holds the value “After sunset” and a trigger is breached:

Turn on a light when daypart is "After sunset"
Turn on a light when daypart is “After sunset”

 

Adding the Vision Siren to Fibaro Home Center 2

When you add the Vision sirene to Fibaro Home Center, it will be marked as an On/Off switch. The controlled device is “Other Device”, which makes the sirene somewhat unusuable, as this will result in no sirene when an alarm occurs.

There are two versions of the Vision sirene. One works on batteries, the other one accepts chargers voltage DC 12V – 39V or AC 9V – 28V, which leaves a wide choice. We choose a charger with 12V DC.

Installation of the module is quite easy. Just remove the white plate and remove the small black jumper located near the large capacitor and put it back into the position where two pin heads are covered.

Inclusion in Fibaro HC2

Now on to the inclusion in the Home Center 2.  As with any new module, go to the Devices tab, and then add a new device. After succesfull inclusion there will be a new ON/OFF device. As you will see, the producer is unknown and the controlled device is marked as “Other Device”.

Vision added to Fibaro HC2
Vision added to Fibaro HC2

After replacing the default icon, we change the controlled device to “Lightning”. This is necessary to use the built-in alarm panel from Fibaro. Your device will look like this:

Change icon and controlled device
Change icon and controlled device

Fibaro Alarm Panel

Now its time to configure the Fibaro Alarm Panel. As we changed the controlled device above to lightning, you can pick the “Vision Sirene” in the “PANIC” alarm scene.

Now the sirene is part of the elements to be activated on alarm. It will sound an alarm when a detection is made or another Panic situation occurs. It would be nice to stop it at any given time (also during the alarm). This is optional, as you can set the duration of the alarm with the configuration parameters (listed below). You can use a scene for this, and configure it to turn off with a pincode. You can always access this scene and turn it off in case of a false trigger.

Parameter Settings

If you do not make any scenes the siren will (by default) sound for 30 seconds. Parameter  0:

  • 0 = Flash Siren and active (default)
  • 1 = Siren only
  • 2 = Flash only

Parameter 1: 

  • 0 = 30 seconds (default)
  • 1 = 60 seconds
  • 2 = 120 seconds
  • 3 = don’t stop

Adding the Vision Siren to Fibaro Home Center 2

When you add the Vision sirene to Fibaro Home Center, it will be marked as an On/Off switch. The controlled device is “Other Device”, which makes the sirene somewhat unusuable, as this will result in no sirene when an alarm occurs.

There are two versions of the Vision sirene. One works on batteries, the other one accepts chargers voltage DC 12V – 39V or AC 9V – 28V, which leaves a wide choice. We choose a charger with 12V DC.

Installation of the module is quite easy. Just remove the white plate and remove the small black jumper located near the large capacitor and put it back into the position where two pin heads are covered.

Inclusion in Fibaro HC2

Now on to the inclusion in the Home Center 2.  As with any new module, go to the Devices tab, and then add a new device. After succesfull inclusion there will be a new ON/OFF device. As you will see, the producer is unknown and the controlled device is marked as “Other Device”.

Vision added to Fibaro HC2
Vision added to Fibaro HC2

After replacing the default icon, we change the controlled device to “Lightning”. This is necessary to use the built-in alarm panel from Fibaro. Your device will look like this:

Change icon and controlled device
Change icon and controlled device

Fibaro Alarm Panel

Now its time to configure the Fibaro Alarm Panel. As we changed the controlled device above to lightning, you can pick the “Vision Sirene” in the “PANIC” alarm scene.

Now the sirene is part of the elements to be activated on alarm. It will sound an alarm when a detection is made or another Panic situation occurs. It would be nice to stop it at any given time (also during the alarm). This is optional, as you can set the duration of the alarm with the configuration parameters (listed below). You can use a scene for this, and configure it to turn off with a pincode. You can always access this scene and turn it off in case of a false trigger.

Parameter Settings

If you do not make any scenes the siren will (by default) sound for 30 seconds. Parameter  0:

  • 0 = Flash Siren and active (default)
  • 1 = Siren only
  • 2 = Flash only

Parameter 1: 

  • 0 = 30 seconds (default)
  • 1 = 60 seconds
  • 2 = 120 seconds
  • 3 = don’t stop

Installing the RFXCOM to the VERA

If you would like Vera to work with non Z-Wave wireless home automation equipment (such as the LightwaveRF, X10, etc) then take a look at the RFXCOM USB Transciever 433,92Mhz. This module gives you the ability to communicate with a large number of products that operate within in the 433Mhz range.

Hooking up the RFXCOM to the VERA is not that hard:

  1. Plug the USB cable of the RFXCOM Transceiver into the back of your Vera;
  2. Once connected you need to upload all the required device files onto our Vera via Apps / Develop Apps / Luup Files. These files can be found by looking at MiCasaVerde RFXrtx433 Plugin Beta3 Code Page (or download directly here);
  3. You need to upload every file seperately. Due to the number of files that need to be uploaded you will need to do this in a couple of batches. Make sure to restart Luup after eacht batch (just select the box);

    Upload files one by one. Restart Luup after each batch.
    Upload files one by one. Restart Luup after each batch.
  4.  After the files uploaded, you now need to Create the master device using Apps / Develop Apps / Create Device, and enter the D_RFXtrx.xml file name into the Upnp Device Filename field.

    Create a new device
    Create a new device
  5. To setup the serial port, choose Serial Port configuration, where you need to change the speed value to 38400 bauds and also select the device named “RFXtrx controller device” from the field “Used by device”. 

    Change baud rate and device type
    Change baud rate and device type
  6. That should be it. Do a “Reload” to make sure everything is reloaded. There should be no error messages and when you go back to your device tab, you will see something like this:There are already found some RFX devices. They will be automatically be shown in the interface when found by the RFXCOM.
    There are already found some RFX devices.

Installing the RFXCOM to the VERA

If you would like Vera to work with non Z-Wave wireless home automation equipment (such as the LightwaveRF, X10, etc) then take a look at the RFXCOM USB Transciever 433,92Mhz. This module gives you the ability to communicate with a large number of products that operate within in the 433Mhz range.

Hooking up the RFXCOM to the VERA is not that hard:

  1. Plug the USB cable of the RFXCOM Transceiver into the back of your Vera;
  2. Once connected you need to upload all the required device files onto our Vera via Apps / Develop Apps / Luup Files. These files can be found by looking at MiCasaVerde RFXrtx433 Plugin Beta3 Code Page (or download directly here);
  3. You need to upload every file seperately. Due to the number of files that need to be uploaded you will need to do this in a couple of batches. Make sure to restart Luup after eacht batch (just select the box);

    Upload files one by one. Restart Luup after each batch.
    Upload files one by one. Restart Luup after each batch.
  4.  After the files uploaded, you now need to Create the master device using Apps / Develop Apps / Create Device, and enter the D_RFXtrx.xml file name into the Upnp Device Filename field.

    Create a new device
    Create a new device
  5. To setup the serial port, choose Serial Port configuration, where you need to change the speed value to 38400 bauds and also select the device named “RFXtrx controller device” from the field “Used by device”. 

    Change baud rate and device type
    Change baud rate and device type
  6. That should be it. Do a “Reload” to make sure everything is reloaded. There should be no error messages and when you go back to your device tab, you will see something like this:There are already found some RFX devices. They will be automatically be shown in the interface when found by the RFXCOM.
    There are already found some RFX devices.